Thursday, May 10, 2007

After reading a bit of 1984, I've begun to realize that I've never really read anything about dystopian societies. The whole idea of a dystopia is starting to disturb me. I chose 1984 because I was interested by the restrictions put over the citizens. Now that I have continued to read, the idea of being so carefully controlled by your government is weirding me out. I don't think that I'll ever have a government that reads my thoughts or has a telescreen with the ability to hear and see my every move, but just the idea is pretty strange.
I predict that in the course of the book, these ideas will become more severe; more restrictions will be created, and Winston will have even more trouble keeping his affairs private from the government.

4 comments:

Clay Burell said...

Hmmm....You write, "I don't think that I'll ever have a government that reads my thoughts or has a telescreen with the ability to hear and see my every move, but just the idea is pretty strange."

If you do a quick search on "domestic surveillance wiretapping Bush" you might find food for thought.

I look forward to reading your discoveries from over here in Korea.

--a fellow American :)

Liz said...

I agree with your thinking, I also have never thought or read about Dystopia worlds.Its frightening to actually think about a place where you get captured and vanished from existence if you show a slight difference in what the community wants you to be.-Liz <3333333

Hayley said...

I agree with you very much. A dystopian society is very disturbing. I dont agree with all of the decisions the government makes, but i guess thats what the society is. As time goes on the book gets even more disturbing. The Two Minutes Hate is also something that you fill find very odd. I know that i would not like to live in a dystopian society.

ZK said...

For the most part, I feel that the main reason that dystopian societies is to "warn" the public that stuff like this can happen. Don't feel like you are the only one that is disturbed by this. I believe that disturbing the reader is the author's way of warning you about what could happen in the future.